The 4th Annual NYC IBD Research Day is September 12, 2018 with an outstanding group of speakers. Registering for the event is free but space is limited. To attend, please visit the event link here. The latest study from the Jill Roberts Institute, "Sensing Microbial Viability through Bacterial RNA Augments T Follicular Helper Cell and Antibody Responses," was published on March 13 in Immunity. To read more, click here.  The latest reviews from the Jill Roberts Institute, "Neuronal–immune system cross-talk in homeostasis" was published on March 30 in Science and "Beyond Host Defense: Emerging Functions of the Immune System in Regulating Complex Tissue Physiology" was published on April 19 in Cell. Dr. Gregory Sonnenberg wins inaugural award from the Society for Mucosal Immunology. To read more, click here.  The Kenneth Rainin Foundation awarded Dr. Iliyan Iliev and colleagues from Mount Sinai a $250,000 Synergy Award to examine the composition of the fungal community in babies born to mothers with inflammatory bowel disease. To read more, click here. Dr. Randy Longman received the Irma T. Hirschl Career Scientist Award and the New York Crohn’s Foundation Award.    

The Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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Randy Longman, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

I am a gastroenterologist and mucosal immunologist focused on basic research to understand the causes and to develop new therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).  Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects over 2 million Americans.  While pharmacologic advances have improved the care of these patients, many still have refractory disease with significant morbidity.  IBD includes two distinct clinical phenotypes called Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.  Genetic polymorphisms correlate with disease susceptibility, but they are rarely fully penetrant reflecting a central role for environmental triggers in disease pathogenesis.  While indeed certain luminal microbes may act as opportunistic pathogens causing infection and inflammation, we and others have shown that microbiota function as a double-edged sword to simultaneously suppress aberrant immune cell activation (homeostatic inhibition) and maintain homeostasis (homeostatic induction) at mucosal surfaces.  Thus, the major focus of our work is to define cellular and molecular regulation of innate intestinal barrier immunity and to harness the power of IBD-associated microbiota to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to medically refractory IBD.

Education and Training

  • M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College 2007
  • Ph.D., The Rockefeller University 2006

 

View Recent Publications

 

Grants awarded

Weill Cornell Medicine The Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease 413 E 69th Street, 7th Floor New York, NY 10021 Phone: (646) 962-6312