The latest study from the Jill Roberts Institute, "The neuropeptide neuromedin U stimulates innate lymphoid cells and type 2 inflammation," was published on September 6 in Nature. To read more, click here.     Dr. Gregory Sonnenberg wins inaugural award from the Society for Mucosal Immunology. To read more, click here.  The Kenneth Rainin Foundation awarded Dr. Iliyan Iliev and colleagues from Mount Sinai a $250,000 Synergy Award to examine the composition of the fungal community in babies born to mothers with inflammatory bowel disease. To read more, click here. Dr. Randy Longman received the Irma T. Hirschl Career Scientist Award and the New York Crohn’s Foundation Award.    

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Emerging concepts and future challenges in innate lymphoid cell biology.

TitleEmerging concepts and future challenges in innate lymphoid cell biology.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsWojno, EDTait, Artis, D
JournalJ Exp Med
Volume213
Issue11
Pagination2229-2248
Date Published2016 Oct 17
ISSN1540-9538
Abstract

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate immune cells that are ubiquitously distributed in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues and enriched at mucosal and barrier surfaces. Three major ILC subsets are recognized in mice and humans. Each of these subsets interacts with innate and adaptive immune cells and integrates cues from the epithelium, the microbiota, and pathogens to regulate inflammation, immunity, tissue repair, and metabolic homeostasis. Although intense study has elucidated many aspects of ILC development, phenotype, and function, numerous challenges remain in the field of ILC biology. In particular, recent work has highlighted key new questions regarding how these cells communicate with their environment and other cell types during health and disease. This review summarizes new findings in this rapidly developing field that showcase the critical role ILCs play in directing immune responses through their ability to interact with a variety of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. In addition, we define remaining challenges and emerging questions facing the field. Finally, this review discusses the potential application of basic studies of ILC biology to the development of new treatments for human patients with inflammatory and infectious diseases in which ILCs play a role.

DOI10.1084/jem.20160525
Alternate JournalJ. Exp. Med.
PubMed ID27811053
PubMed Central IDPMC5068238
Grant ListR01 AI074878 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI095466 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
P01 AI106697 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
K22 AI116729 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI102942 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R21 AI087990 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
U01 AI095608 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI061570 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI097333 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States